Taking the Plunge: Full-time to Freelance

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I’m generally very risk averse and never thought I’d want to be a freelancer — until I did. It was like waking up and suddenly liking cilantro. Unthinkable.

I’d been a full-time, mostly in-house designer for the bulk of 20 years in both Chicago and Los Angeles. This past fall, I found myself increasingly frustrated at my current job and having a lot of fun working with a regular freelance client. I think the proximity to turning 40 gave me perspective: Life is short, and I didn’t like how I was spending my days. Suddenly, I found myself reading articles with titles like “Am I Ready to Freelance,” and the resounding answer appeared to be yes. Soon, I gave my two weeks’ notice at a company where people really only leave if they’re retiring, get laid off or, shall we say, go to the cubicle in the sky.

After six months of the expected ups and downs but still feeling no regret, I asked members of the Freelancing Females group on Facebook why they switched to freelancing. I suspected the reasons would vary more than I’d have expected before I’d made the change myself. The responses fascinated me, and most common reason may surprise you.

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